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Dip Your Toes into LINES IN THE SKY's New Video for "Thalassophobia"

Posted by on May 17, 2019 at 12:44 pm

Earlier this year, Nashville alternative/progressive rock trio Lines in the Sky—vocalist/guitarist Jesse Brock, percussionist Bowman Brock, and bassist Ben McAnelly—released their latest single, “Thalassophobia.” The follow-up to their stunning third LP, 2018’s Beacon, the track finds the troupe continuing to expand upon the characteristic creativity and techniques that make them one of the best up-and-coming acts in the genre. Sure, they channel peers like Coheed and Cambria, Closure in Moscow, and The Mars Volta in the midst of their high-pitched odes and frenetic arrangements; however, “Thalassophobia” is arguably the best example yet of why Lines in the Sky radiates specialties all their own, too.

Today, the band is happy to premiere the accompanying music video for the track. Produced by Adam Warne (vocalist/keyboardist of another outstanding progressive rock band, Kyros), the animated video unfolds like a storybook. In a way, it actually conjures animation previously used by groups like The Decemberists and The Fiery Furnaces. It begins with the viewer peering at a whale (designed by Chris Rogers) before slanted shots of waves, seaweed, and other oceanic trademarks are interspersed around the lyrics. Occasionally, VHS static transitions provide more intrigue. While it’s a relatively reserved short film, it nonetheless keeps you engaged throughout. Beyond that, it also effectively expresses its namesake’s lyrics—“Leave the old architecture beneath the sea / Reinterpret your failures / Finally breach for all to see”—and entrancing blend of glisteningly emotive singing, thunderous syncopation, multilayered six-string outbursts, and inventively dynamic ebbs and flows. In total, then, it may be the best thing Lines in the Sky has produced thus far.

Of the piece, Jesse Brock aptly elaborates:

“Thalassophobia” is our most recent indulgence of heavy influences. We even kicked on a pitch shifter, so it sounds like we’re playing an extended range guitar.  I also ventured out of my comfort zone on this song and added a guitar solo. Guitar tones on this track are really diverse, too, and there are several texture changes that help with the development. We really want to experiment with synth bass moving forward, and this was our first jump into that territory. We also wanted to add some programming in certain areas to augment the drums.

Lyrically, there are two interpretations: isolation induced by depression, anxiety, a lack of self-confidence, etc., as well as a play on Lovecraftian horror. For example, there are references to several elements of his stories, perhaps implying that the main character is not feeling a call of isolation from some illness but rather from an entity from beyond human comprehension. It invokes cool imagery.

Check out Lines in the Sky’s video for “Thalassophobia” below and be sure to purchase the single here, as well as keep your eyes and ears out for what they do next!

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